Tillman Ravine and Walpack Cemetery in May

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Tillman Ravine is a gorgeous short hike with a rushing stream and multiple water cascades. Follow an unmarked trail to check out Walpack Cemetery.

For current hike info, photos, and video visit our “Tillman Ravine” page.

Our spring hiking so far was getting tripped up by weather, weekend obligations, and a vacation spent tooling around the Yucatan in Mexico (where the vast, flat expanses of trees reminded us of Jersey’s Pinelands!).

Finally we got some time free, and with some recent rain decided on two hikes with plenty of waterfall action. First up, a quick 2.0 miles at Tillman Ravine, followed by Millbrook – Van Campens Glen.

Tillman Ravine is flat out gorgeous and is an easy, short hike with a rushing stream, and plenty of water cascades.

This is a small area, and you really aren’t going to get lost – it’s fine to just stroll and wander around… but you might want to print out this Tilman Ravine Map – it’s the best detail of the trail we found online.

It’s a photo of the map that is behind the glass at the trail kiosk, courtesy of www.danbalogh.com. There weren’t any printouts at the kiosk, don’t think there usually is.

From the 1st parking lot (coming from the direction of Millbrook) we headed left onto the Perimeter trail (noted by rectangles) and meandered in a sort of figure-8.

Past the “teacup” (a pool of water, marked on the map) and where we’d turn to head back to the lot, we instead followed the unmarked path to Walpack Cemetery (noted by “C” on the map).

When you arrive at the dirt road, turn right and the cemetery is there. Retrace your route back to Tillman and and finish the Perimeter trail back to the lot.

The cemetery can be visited by car, and in fact we drove past it on the way in. The unmarked path from Tillman’s Ravine to Walpack Cemetery is quite pleasant, however, and worth the stroll. The gravestones date to the 1800’s.